oliviawhen:

A little late, but happy earth day! Have some rainy birds. 

(via 33blackbirds)

ohscience:

brittle star scientific illustration

ohscience:

brittle star scientific illustration

(via afragmentcastadrift)

skunkbear:

First prize in Science’s Visualization Challenge (video category) went to this NASA video by Greg Shirah, Horace Mitchell, and Tom Bridgman. It shows Earth’s “climate engine” — the wind patterns and ocean currents that are powered by the sun.

(via grimdarkcake)

thatkindofwoman:

The Made Shop - The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories (2012)

thatkindofwoman:

The Made Shop - The Tiny Book of Tiny Stories (2012)

(Source: suckybl0g, via 33blackbirds)

qunlat:

...and we do what must be done

(Source: pentaghastly, via spockn)

refinedmind:

Just before nightfall I decided to take a walk outside. The sky was low, enveloping any object in its reach. It formed a dull, purplish haze - like nothing I’d seen before. The streets were empty. Not a single soul was out. It was oddly peaceful - imagining I was the only one left.

(via englishsnow)

smalyon:

Valar Morghulis, 2014

*spoilers*

This illustration follows the path of Arya in the A Song of Ice and Fire series. I wanted to chronicle all of the death that she has encountered on her journey. I’ve included every target on her list and every person that she has killed. For every mark who is dead, I’ve included how they died in some small way (The Tickler’s many stab wounds, the bite marks on Weese, etc). 

The burning holdfast in the bottom half of the illustration represents the attack on the nights watch by Ser Amory’s men in A Clash of Kings. The towers burning in the centre represent the Red Wedding at the twins. While these events were pivotal in Arya’s journey, I felt that by the fifth book, she no longer allows herself to dwell on the events that have transpired, she is simply overcome by bloodlust for the men who did it. 

The decaying face and the skull both represent the House of Black in White in Braavos. They hint at the masks that Arya now wears. 

This illustration was created as a companion piece to The Things I do for Love.

Prints available.

shannon-freeman:

In Irish folklore, mermaids (called “merrows”) collect the souls of those drowned at sea. I’m not sure if that’s a child-appropriate story, but this cutesy picture was lots of fun to draw!

shannon-freeman:

In Irish folklore, mermaids (called “merrows”) collect the souls of those drowned at sea. I’m not sure if that’s a child-appropriate story, but this cutesy picture was lots of fun to draw!

thelovelyseas:

Leafy sea dragons by David Hall